STEM & NUFFIELD - Science Technology Engineering Maths

 

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BRIGHTON UNI - Nuffield Research Placements (previously Nuffield Science Bursaries) provide over 1,100 students each year with the opportunity to work alongside professional scientists (including quantitative social scientists), technologists, engineers and mathematicians.

Students in the first year of a post-16 science, technology, engineering and maths (STEM) course are eligible to apply. Placements are available across the UK, in universities, commercial companies, voluntary organizations and research institutions.

Nuffield Research Placements are administered at a regional level by a network of Nuffield coordinators.

They particularly encourage students who don't have a family history of going to university or who attend schools in less well-off areas. The Trust makes sure no-one is excluded on a financial basis by covering students' travel costs. Some students may also be eligible for a weekly bursary in addition to travel expenses. Your regional coordinator will be able to advise on eligibility.

 

 

WHAT ARE NUFFIELD PLACEMENTS?

Nuffield Research offer over 1,000 funded placements a year to sixth-form students who want an insight into scientific R&D, including areas of technology, engineering and maths, giving them the chance to work alongside STEM professionals.

It’s a national scheme, but STEM Sussex are the regional coordinators.

 

Who can be a project provider?

Anyone working in a STEM role can offer a 4-6 week research or development project during the school summer holidays to a student who has just completed their first year in the sixth form.

 

How much does it cost?

Nothing – there is no upfront cost to project providers and all that’s required is your staff’s time to supervise the student. Student’s travel costs are covered and there is a bursary for those from low-income backgrounds.

 

What are the benefits?

- Your organisation’s future – placements have a lasting impact on students’ education and career choices.
- Teaching and mentoring skills – staff looking for management experience, as well as PhD students and post-doctoral researchers, find placements particularly useful.
- Potential contributions to published papers and/or grant applications.
- Pilot or side projects staff normally struggle to find time for.
- Public engagement and corporate social responsibility.

Nuffield students need supervision and guidance, but they can make a significant contribution. They work to a high standard – on pilot projects, on projects that have been shelved through lack of time or as part of a larger project. They may be office, lab or field based, purely academic or in a development area such as engineering.

 

 

STEM Sussex, University of Brighton

 

BRIGHTON UNI - Our point of contact in the UK is Brighton University, a great bunch and very enthusiastic, as are we, about making education fun. It should be fun to learn.

 

 

Brighton University STEM programme

 

BRIGHTON UNI - Nuffield Research Placements offer over 1000 funded placements a year to UK students wanting to get an insight into the world of scientific, research and development, including areas of technology, engineering and maths.

Placements are offered to students in Year 12 studying STEM subjects. Through the scheme, students get the opportunity to work alongside practising scientists, technologist, engineers and mathematicians in the workplace. Placements last four to six weeks, in universities, industry or research institutions during the summer holidays.

 

 

Coastal Stemfest and the Big Bang

 

COASTAL - STEMfest is a programme of interactive events taking place in February and March 2018 including demonstrations, workshops, shows and a careers day. Hundreds of young people are involved, along with their parents and teachers, and anyone who has an interest in, or works in STEM.

It aims to enthuse the next generation to study and build careers in Science, Technology, Engineering and Maths, and to develop the tools and techniques that will drive the economy of the future.

The programme culminates in the Big Bang at Butlin’s, Bognor Regis on Thursday 8th March 2018. Please check out the gallery from last year’s event or watch the video from the Big Bang Fair @ Butlin’s Bognor Regis so you can see what they are all about.

 

 

Sussex County STEM alliance, Delaware, USA

 

TWINS - Somewhat confusingly for many in England who are a bit rusty on our history, Lewes is an incorporated city on the Delaware Bay in eastern Sussex County, Delaware, USA. Along with neighboring Rehoboth Beach, Lewes is one of the principal cities of Delaware's rapidly growing Cape Region. The city lies within the Salisbury, Maryland–Delaware Metropolitan Statistical Area. Lewes proudly claims to be "The First Town in The First State."

In 1682, the Delaware colonies were given to William Penn by English King Charles II in payment of a family debt. When Penn arrived in the New World later that year, he renamed the county as Sussex and the Hoernkills settlement as Lewes, in commemoration of sites back in England. Lewes became and remained the county seat of Sussex County until 1791, when it was moved to a more west-central county location, the current town of Georgetown.

 

 

STEM SUSSEX FAQS

 

Who on the team should I speak to?

 

STEM Sussex is made up of a small and dedicated team. If you are not sure who you need to speak to about a particular event or project, have a look at our staff biography for the who’s who of STEM Sussex.

 

 

What are STEM Ambassadors?

 

STEM Ambassadors are volunteers with a STEM background who give up time to inspire the next generation. They are a FREE resource for schools. To find our more or to request Ambassador support please visit: 

 

www.stemsussex.co.uk/volunteers/stem-ambassadors/stem-ambassadors-schools

 

 

How do I get involved in the Big Bang Fair South East?

 

The Big Bang Fair is an exciting, interactive event that’s loads of fun, but with serious careers messages underpinning it all. Students aged 9-19 can meet representatives from local employers and PEIs and see what a future career in STEM might look like. They’ll take part in a range of interactive workshops, shows and activities and get to try new things.

 

If you want to get more information and register to attend:

 

www.stemsussex.co.uk/secondary/whats-on-1/big-bang-fair-south-east/.

 

 

STEM UK

 

 

Are there other Big Bang events closer to me?

 

Big Bang events are vibrant days enthusing the next generation with interactive table top activities which highlight the depth and range of career possibilities.  For Big Bang @ events near you, please visit: http://nearme.thebigbangfair.co.uk/regions/704

 

 

Am I eligible for free STEMfest activities?

 

Currently schools in CrawleyCoastal West Sussex and East Sussex can get involved in their local STEMfests. Unfortunately, schools outside these regions don’t have a dedicated STEMfest (yet!) but can attend free events, such as the Big Bang Fair South East.

 

Interested in a STEMfest in your region? We can support you to deliver a programme with a proven track record.

 

Contact us to discuss. stemsussex@brighton.ac.uk

 

 

Crawley Stemfest and the Big Bang Fair

 

 

What is a CREST Award?

 

www.stemsussex.co.uk/primary/competition-calendar/

 

The CREST Awards scheme is the British Science Association’s flagship programme for young people, providing science enrichment activities to inspire and engage 5-to-19-year olds. It is the only nationally recognised accreditation scheme for project work in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) subjects.

 

CREST gives students the chance to participate in hands-on science through investigations and enquiry-based learning. It can be run in schools, clubs, youth groups, other organisations or at home. They are well regarded, high quality and a tangible recognition of success.

 

There are five CREST Award Levels, allowing students to progress through the scheme throughout their education. 

 

For primary schools visit here: www.stemsussex.co.uk/competition/crest-star-award

For secondary schools visit here:

 

www.stemsussex.co.uk/secondary/schemes-and-competitions/crest-awards/

 

 

What can my school do for our STEM day or theme week?

 

Cost is always a factor when planning a STEM enrichment day or theme week. Here are some suggestions you could consider to make it as affordable as possible.

 

Our in-school Enrichment Activities are run at cost price. Have a look at the Primary or secondary activity areas on our website. We can discuss ways of making the activity affordable for your school or adapting it for your school's needs. 

 

If you are a primary school, consider doing a CREST Star Award please visit http://www.crestawards.org/run-crest-awards/crest-star/. Free resources for KS1 and KS2.

For all schools – visit our ideas and inspiration area. You can filter by subject area and Key Stage to find something to suit your school’s needs. 

 

Why not enter a competition to win some amazing prizes for your school. For the primary competition calendar, click here. For the secondary competition calendar, click here

 

Plan your theme week or STEM day to coincide with your nearest STEMfest. Currently schools in CrawleyCoastal West Sussex and East Sussex can get involved in their local STEMfests.

 

Unfortunately, schools outside these regions don’t have a dedicated STEMfest (yet!) but can attend free events, such as the Big Bang Fair South East.

 

 

Can you help us find work experience for our students?

 

We coordinate the popular Nuffield Research Placements scheme in Sussex and Hampshire, for year 12 students, but unfortunately we do not have the resources to support work experience other than this, and for data protection reasons are unable to share details of our contacts. Occasionally companies will email us offering work experience, and in these instances we will advertise it via our school newsletter. To subscribe to our monthly newsletter please sign up here

 

 

Crawley News, Gatwick hosts STEM Sussex

 

GATWICK AIRPORT - For several years, Gatwick has hosted the Sussex and Surrey FIRST® LEGO® League regional tournament, where teams of students compete to build LEGO® robots.

FIRST® LEGO® League is an international robotics-based competition, which aims to excite young people aged 9 to 16 years about Science, Technology, Engineering and Maths (STEM). It is a global competition with over 30,000 teams involving more than half a million young people.

Teams are judged on their ability to build and program the robot, their research, teamwork and presentation skills.

We are also headline sponsors of Crawley STEMfest which gives 20,000 local young people the chance to learn about STEM career paths. This culminates with the Big Bang Fair South East where thousands of people come along and learn about science through activities, shows and workshops.

 

 

What’s going on this year?

 

We have events and activities running throughout the year. There are several ways you can keep in touch:

Visit the ‘what’s on?’ section in the primary or secondary school area:

 

Primary What’s on?

 

Secondary What’s on?

 

Alternatively, you can follow us on social media:

 

Twitter: stemsussex

Facebook: stemsussex1

Blog: http://blogs.brighton.ac.uk/stemsussex/

 

Sign up for our monthly newsletter: Teacher newsletter

 

 

COF LTD STEM PROJECTS:

 

     ABOUT STEM  - BOAT HULL LOW CARBON DESIGN

                            - ELECTRIC SPORTS CAR GULL WING DESIGN

                            - EV NATIONAL CHARGING GRID

                            - MECHATRONIC ROBOT GIANT

 

 

Prototype frame for a giant hexapod robot

 

SUSSEX ROBOT PROJECT - This is a challenge to complete a giant hexapod that is capable of carrying a human over rough ground. This project is designed to help engineering students problem solve (think) creatively.

 

 

EMPLOYERS

 

What activities, schemes and events do you run?

 

STEM Ambassadors are volunteers with a STEM background who give up time to inspire the next generation. Become an Ambassador or support your employees' participation in the STEM Ambassador programme. STEM Ambassadors motivate young learners whilst developing their own communication, presentation and planning skills. It is a fantastic way to promote your company within your local community. For more information please visit: 

 

www.stemsussex.co.uk/volunteers/stem-ambassadors/stem-ambassadors-companies

 

Big Bang @ events - Each STEMfest (see below) culminates in a Big Bang event, a vibrant day enthusing the next generation with interactive table top activities which highlight the depth and range of career possibilities.  For Big Bang @ events near you, please visit:

 

http://nearme.thebigbangfair.co.uk/regions/704

 

STEMfest is a series of free workshops, activities and shows that take place in schools, colleges, in the community and with local employers. There are now several STEMfests across the South East that showcase the latest STEM innovations, careers and opportunities. As an employer, there are lots of ways to get involved. For More information about Crawley, Coastal, East Sussex and Lewes please visit http://www.stemfest.co.uk/

 

Nuffield Research Placements offer over 1000 funded placements a year to UK students wanting to get an insight into the world of scientific,  research and development, including areas of technology, engineering and maths.

 

Placements are offered to students in Year 12 studying STEM subjects and last four to six weeks, in universities, industry or research institutions during the summer holidays.

 

There are no upfront costs to prokect providers. ll we ask you to offer is the premises and you/your staff's time to supervise the students. The students' travel costs are covered and there is an additional bursary for those from low income backgrounds.

 

For more information please visit: 

 

www.stemsussex.co.uk/secondary/schemes-and-competitions/nuffield-research-placements/providers

 

The Engineering Education Scheme (EES) in England & Scotland is an EDT Programme which links teams of talented and motivated Year 12 (age 16/17) students and their teacher with local companies to work on real, scientific, engineering and technological problems. The scheme runs from October to April each year. 

 

Working with young people on the EES makes a huge difference to your business. EES students offer a fresh perspective and can support skill development of existing employees. If you are an employer and want to work with talented and motivated students please visit:

 

 www.stemsussex.co.uk/employers/how-to-get-involved/engineering-education-scheme/

 

 

 

 

What are STEM Ambassadors?

 

STEM Ambassadors are volunteers with a STEM background who give up time to inspire the next generation. Become an Ambassador or support your employees' participation in the STEM Ambassador programme. STEM Ambassadors motivate young learners whilst developing their own communication, presentation and planning skills. It is a fantastic way to promote your company within your local community.

For more information please

 

visit: www.stemsussex.co.uk/volunteers/stem-ambassadors/stem-ambassadors-companies/

 

 

What is the Nuffield Research Placement Scheme ?

 

Nuffield Research Placements offer over 1000 funded placements a year to UK students wanting to get an insight into the world of scientific,  research and development, including areas of technology, engineering and maths.

 

Placements are offered to students in Year 12 studying STEM subjects. Through the scheme, students get the opportunity to work alongside practicing scientists, technologist, engineers and mathematicians in the workplace. Placements last four to six weeks, in universities, industry or research institutions during the summer holidays.

 

There are no upfront costs to project providers. ll we ask you to offer is the premises and you/your staff's time to supervise the students. The students' travel costs are covered and there is an additional bursary for those from low income backgrounds.

 

For more information please visit: 

 

www.stemsussex.co.uk/secondary/schemes-and-competitions/nuffield-research-placements/providers

 

 

What do I need to know about the Engineering Education Scheme?

 

The Engineering Education Schem(EES) in England & Scotland is an EDT Programme which links teams of talented and motivated Year 12 (age 16/17) students and their teacher with local companies to work on real, scientific, engineering and technological problems. The scheme runs from October to April each year. 

 

The scheme provides students with an in-depth experience in science, engineering and technology that will enable them to make an informed decision about their future studies and career.

 

Working with young people on the EES makes a huge difference to your business. EES students offer a fresh perspective and can support skill development of existing employees. 

 

If you are an employer and want to work with talented and motivated students please visit

 

www.stemsussex.co.uk/employers/how-to-get-involved/engineering-education-scheme/

 

 

Julia King the Baroness Brown of Cambridge

 

CHAIR - BARONESS BROWN OF CAMBRIDGE

 

Yvonne Baker chief executive of STEM

 

CH EXEC - YVONNE BAKER

 

Chair of the board - After an academic career at Cambridge University, Baroness Brown held senior business and engineering posts at Rolls-Royce. She returned to academia as Principal of the Engineering Faculty at Imperial College and served as Vice-Chancellor of Aston University from 2006 to 2016. 

Baroness Brown advises the Government as vice-chair of the Committee on Climate Change. She is the Prime Minister’s Low Carbon Business Ambassador and is a member of the World Economic Forum Global Agenda Council on Decarbonizing Energy. 

She also chairs the Henry Royce Institute for Advanced Materials and is a non-executive director of the Offshore Renewable Energy Catapult.

 

5 January 2017: Professor Julia King (Baroness Brown of Cambridge) The Committee on Climate Change’s Adaptation Sub-Committee will have a new Chair from 1 February 2017

Baroness Brown of Cambridge, Professor Dame Julia King, has been appointed as the next Chair of the Committee on Climate Change’s Adaptation Sub-Committee.

Lord Krebs has led the work of the Adaptation Sub-Committee since it was formed in May 2009 – he will step down from both the ASC and CCC at the end of January 2017, after which Baroness Brown will take over on 1 February 2017.

As well as serving as the new Chair of the Adaptation Sub-Committee, Baroness Brown will continue to sit on the Committee on Climate Change.

 

Yvonne Baker has been Chief Executive of STEM Learning since 2010. She is a Chartered Chemical Engineer and Fellow of the Royal Society of Arts with a background in manufacturing and international consultancy. 

In 2002, Yvonne established the STEM Ambassadors programme at STEMNET, where she was Chief Executive from 2005-2010. She sits on the National Science and Media Museum Board and the STFC Skills and Engagement Advisory Board and is a governor of two secondary schools. She won the 2015 First Woman in Science award.

Yvonne Baker, the Chief Executive of MyScience. Yvonne is a chartered chemical engineer and she believes passionately in the importance of STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Maths) careers and the contribution they make to our society.

MyScience operates the UK National Science Learning Centre and the National STEM Centre. The National Science Learning Centre provides professional development for science teachers, technicians and lecturers. This supports schools and their students; providing excellent education and improved awareness.

The National STEM Centre is a STEM teaching and learning resource. This facility brings together business, industry, professional institutions (like IChemE), other charities and those interested in STEM education.

Yvonne was formerly the Chief Executive of STEMNET (the STEM Network). This UK-based network of volunteers creates opportunities to inspire young people, of all backgrounds in STEM (science, technology, engineering and mathematics). Many IChemE members are also STEMNET volunteers.

 

VOLUNTEERS

 

What are STEM Ambassadors?

 

STEM Ambassadors are volunteers with a STEM background who give up time to inspire the next generation. 

 

They cross all ages and backgrounds, representing thousands of different employers across the UK. Our Ambassadors include apprentices, zoologists, set designers, climate change scientists, engineers, farmers, geologists, nuclear physicists, and architects. They help to open the doors to a world of opportunities and possibilities which come from pursuing STEM subjects and careers. They not only inspire young people; they also support teachers in the classroom by explaining current applications of STEM in industry or research.

 

If you are an individual and want to know more, please visit: 

 

www.stemsussex.co.uk/volunteers/stem-ambassadors/stem-ambassadors-individuals/

 

If you are an employer and want to get your company involved: www.stemsussex.co.uk/volunteers/stem-ambassadors/stem-ambassadors-companies/

 

Alternatively, get in touch with us to find out how we can help you inspire your young people or to find out more about motivating young people by becoming a STEM Ambassador. Contact Daniel Hawkins on 01273 644750 or email him via ambassadors@brighton.ac.uk.

 

 

 

 

How do I get involved in the Big Bang Fair South East?

 

The Big Bang Fair is an exciting, interactive event that’s loads of fun, but with serious career messages underpinning it all. Students aged 9-19 can meet representatives from local employers and PEIs and see what a future career in STEM might look like. They’ll take part in a range of interactive workshops, shows and activities and get to try new things.

 

If you are an volunteer and want to get involved with providing an activity or sponsorship, please contact:  southeast@thebigbangfair.co.uk

 

 

ABOUT LORD NUFFIELD (WILLIAM MORRIS)

 

The Nuffield Foundation is a charitable trust established in 1943 by William Morris, Lord Nuffield, the founder of Morris Motors.

William Morris, later Lord Nuffield, was born in 1877. He left school at 15, and worked in Oxford as a repairer and maker of bicycles. He progressed to motor cycles and finally cars - a natural learning curve as it seems from our experience.

 

 

 

 

William Richard Morris, 1st Viscount Nuffield was the founder of the Morris Motor Company. Morris was born in Worcester, England in 1877. When he was 3 years old his family moved to 16, James Street, Oxford. Upon leaving school at the age of fifteen Morris was apprenticed to a local bicycle seller and repairer. Nine months later, aged 16, he set up a business repairing bicycles from the family home. The business being a success he opened a shop at 48, High Street and began manufacturing as well as repairing bicycles. In 1901, he began to work with motorcycles, designing the Morris Motor Cycle, and in 1902 acquired a garage in Longwall Street from which he sold, repaired and hired cars.

In 1912 he designed a car, the "Bullnose" Morris and began manufacturing at a disused military training college in Cowley, Oxford. The outbreak of World War I saw the nascent car factory given over to the production of munitions but in 1919 car production recommenced rising from 400 cars in that year to 56,000 in 1925. During the period 1919–1925 Morris built or purchased factories at Abingdon, Birmingham, and Swindon to add to that in Oxford. Morris pioneered the introduction to the United Kingdom of Henry Ford's techniques of mass production. In 1927, in competition against — amongst others — Herbert Austin, Morris purchased the bankrupt Wolseley Motor Company and the company passed into his personal control. Wolseley were at this stage in fairly advanced development of an overhead valve 8hp car, which Morris launched as the first Morris Minor in 1928 (this was also the basis of the original MG Midget, launched in 1929).

 

 

Henry Ford and his famous Model T automobile  William Morris with an early MG  Lord Nuffield with a British Leyland Austin 1100

 

PHILANTHROPIST - William Morris was one of the first British industrialists to introduce mass production methods after Ford in America. His company, Morris Motors Ltd, prospered in the years after the First World War. From the first Morris Oxford of 1913 to the post-war Morris Minor, his Morris and MG cars were known around the world.

Lord Nuffield was made a baron in 1934, and a viscount in 1938, and took the name of Nuffield, the Oxfordshire village where he had settled. He died in 1963.

Despite his great wealth, Lord Nuffield remained personally frugal and in later life devoted his energies to the philanthropy that made him a household name. The Nuffield Foundation, his largest benefaction, was founded in 1943 with a gift of £10m-worth of shares in his company.

 

 

In 1938, Nuffield purchased the bankrupt Riley (Coventry) and Autovia companies from the Riley family and quickly sold them to his own Morris Motor Company, with the addition of Wolseley later that year, the combined enterprise became known as the Nuffield Organisation. This merged with Austin Motor Company in 1952 to become the British Motor Corporation. It was later merged with Jaguar to become British Motor Holdings. In 1968, nearly every British automobile manufacturer, including BMH, became British Leyland.

Morris was created as a baronet in 1929, created Baron Nuffield in 1934, and made a viscount in 1938. Both titles became extinguished on his death without issue.

Morris was married to Elizabeth Anstey on 9 April 1904. The couple had no children, and as a result he dispersed a large part of his fortune to charitable causes. Morris founded the Nuffield Foundation in 1943 with an endowment of £10 million in order to advance education and social welfare. Morris also founded Nuffield College, Oxford. The College owns his former Oxfordshire home, Nuffield Place, which is opened to the public, and he is also commemorated in the Morris Motors Museum at the Oxford Bus Museum. 

 

 

 

 

ABOUT STEM UK

 

STEM Learning is the largest provider of education and careers support in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM). According to the Guardian, approximately 40,000 science, technology, engineering and mathematics (Stem) jobs go unfilled every year. There is no way we can generate the number of scientists and engineers the economy requires without tackling this problem. The truth is, Britain can't afford to discriminate. That's why we need to start closing the gender gap now.

 

WOMEN IN SCIENCE

While most of us know that women are under-represented in Stem careers, probably fewer people know by how much. According to Wise (Women in Science and Engineering), women make up just 12.8% of the total Stem workforce in the UK. The UK also has the lowest percentage of female engineering professionals (pdf) in Europe.

 

Women have been making amazing discoveries and forging high-flying careers in Stem industries for centuries, but the actual achievements of women working in the sector have often been overlooked, or even edited out of history. Few people, even those who watch the Oscar-winning film The Imitation Game, will be aware that of the 10,000 people working at Bletchley Park during the second world war, 75% were women, including many talented mathematicians. In fact, some argue the very first computer programmer was a woman: Ada Lovelace worked with Charles Babbage to write code for his analytical engine, an early relative of the computer.

Or look at Rosalind Franklin, whose analysis laid the groundwork for Watson and Crick's discovery of the double helix shape of DNA. Franklin wasn't credited or mentioned in Watson and Crick's paper in the scientific journal Nature, and didn't receive a share in their Nobel prize. The Royal Society hosted a Wikipedia edit-a-thon in March 2014, in which volunteers used the society's library and archive to add and edit Wikipedia entries on women in science. There are hundreds of fantastic role models out there to inspire women to enter a career in Stem – we just need to rediscover them and give them the recognition they deserve.

Many people ask that as long as skilled people are entering the Stem workforce, does it matter if they are male or female? It makes an enormous difference. In June 2013 the Women's Business Council wrote a comprehensive report on women's role in the economy. A key finding was that by equalizing the gender split in the labour force, the UK could further increase GDP by 10% by 2030.

But the most compelling reason for women to get more involved in Stem is that it can be the pathway to a whole range of exciting careers which have the power to change the world, improve the quality of people's lives and give individuals fulfilling and rewarding working lives. What more can you say?

 

 

 

 

 

 

PROJECT ENTHUSE

 

Project ENTHUSE is a funding partnership that was launched in 2008 with £27 million from the Wellcome Trust, the Department for Education, AstraZeneca, AstraZeneca Science Teaching Trust (renamed Primary Science Teaching Trust in 2013), BAE Systems, BP, General Electric Foundation, GlaxoSmithKline, Rolls-Royce, Vodafone and Vodafone Group Foundation.

 

In 2013/14 Project ENTHUSE received further funding of over £22 million from the Department for Education, the Wellcome Trust, BAE Systems, Biochemical Society, BPInstitution of Engineering and Technology, Institution of Mechanical Engineers, Rolls-Royce, Royal Commission for the 1851 Exhibition, IBM, Institution of Structural Engineers and the Royal Society of Chemistry.

 

These organizations came together to bring about inspired science teaching through the continuing professional development of teachers of science across the UK. Project ENTHUSE funding allows the provision of subject specific CPD for teachers, technicians and other support staff at the National STEM Learning Centre in York and through partners in Northern Ireland (Department of Education Northern Ireland), Scotland (SSERC) and Wales (Techniquest).

 

 

 

 

 

 

LINKS & REFERENCE

 

https://www.stem.org.uk/

http://www.nuffieldfoundation.org/

https://sussexstem.com/

https://www.theguardian.com/careers/careers-blog/myths-keeping-women-out-of-stem

http://www.coastalstemfest.co.uk/

https://www.gatwickairport.com/business-community/community-sustainability/education/stem/

http://www.crawleynews24.co.uk/gatwick-hosts-lego-robotics-tournament-with-stem-sussex/

https://www.brighton.ac.uk/careers/volunteering/stem-sussex/index.aspx

 

 

 

 

STEM BOAT PROJECT - If you are into boating, you may want to see the the above low carbon vessel in a test tank to see how efficient it is.

 

 

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STEM IS AN EDUCATIONAL CONCEPT EMBODYING SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY ENGINEERING MATHS