IMF - INTERNATIONAL MONETARY FUND

 

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ONE WORLD ONE OCEAN - In the role of guardians of your geographical regions, there is also a responsibility to develop the blue economy for the international circular economies that a sustainable society requires if we are not to burn planet earth out.

 

 

The International Monetary Fund (IMF) is an international organization headquartered in Washington, D.C., consisting of "189 countries working to foster global monetary cooperation, secure financial stability, facilitate international trade, promote high employment and sustainable economic growth, and reduce poverty around the world." Formed in 1945 at the Bretton Woods Conference primarily by the ideas of Harry Dexter White and John Maynard Keynes, it came into formal existence in 1945 with 29 member countries and the goal of reconstructing the international payment system. It now plays a central role in the management of balance of payments difficulties and international financial crises. Countries contribute funds to a pool through a quota system from which countries experiencing balance of payments problems can borrow money. As of 2016, the fund had SDR477 billion (about $666 billion).

Through the fund, and other activities such as the gathering of statistics and analysis, surveillance of its members' economies and the demand for particular policies, the IMF works to improve the economies of its member countries. The organisation's objectives stated in the Articles of Agreement are: to promote international monetary co-operation, international trade, high employment, exchange-rate stability, sustainable economic growth, and making resources available to member countries in financial difficulty.

The current Managing Director (MD) and Chairman of the International Monetary Fund is noted French lawyer and former politician, Christine Lagarde, who has held the post since 5 July 2011.

 

 

INTERNATIONAL ORGANIZATIONS 2018

 

 

 

WORLD BANK

 

 

FINANCIAL STABILITY BOARD

 

 

INT MONETARY FUND

 

Antonio Guterres

 

UNITED NATIONS

 

 

FOOD & AGRICULTURE ORG

 

 

INT LABOUR ORG

 

 

WORLD TRADE ORG

 

 

ORG ECONOMIC COOPERATION & DEV

 

 

WORLD HEALTH ORG

 

 

WORLD FOOD PROGRAMME

 

 

INT RENEWABLE ENERGY AGENCY

 

 

INT MARITIME ORGANIZATION

 

 

WORLD ECONOMIC FORUM

 

 

UNESCO

 

 

UN HUMAN RIGHT COUNCIL

 

 

 

 

FOOD SECURITY

A number of civil society organisations have criticised the IMF's policies for their impact on access to food, particularly in developing countries. In October 2008, former United States president Bill Clinton delivered a speech to the United Nations on World Food Day, criticising the World Bank and IMF for their policies on food and agriculture:

We need the World Bank, the IMF, all the big foundations, and all the governments to admit that, for 30 years, we all blew it, including me when I was president. We were wrong to believe that food was like some other product in international trade, and we all have to go back to a more responsible and sustainable form of agriculture.


—  Former U.S. president Bill Clinton, Speech at United Nations World Food Day, October 16, 2008.

 

 

GDP 7th largest economy in the world

 

 

ENVIRONMENT

IMF policies have been repeatedly criticised for making it difficult for indebted countries to say no to environmentally harmful projects that nevertheless generate revenues such as oil, coal, and forest-destroying lumber and agriculture projects. Ecuador, for example, had to defy IMF advice repeatedly to pursue the protection of its rainforests, though paradoxically this need was cited in the IMF argument to provide support to Ecuador. The IMF acknowledged this paradox in the 2010 report that proposed the IMF Green Fund, a mechanism to issue special drawing rights directly to pay for climate harm prevention and potentially other ecological protection as pursued generally by other environmental finance.

While the response to these moves was generally positive possibly because ecological protection and energy and infrastructure transformation are more politically neutral than pressures to change social policy. Some experts voiced concern that the IMF was not representative, and that the IMF proposals to generate only US$200 billion a year by 2020 with the SDRs as seed funds, did not go far enough to undo the general incentive to pursue destructive projects inherent in the world commodity trading and banking systems-criticisms often levelled at the World Trade Organization and large global banking institutions.

In the context of the European debt crisis, some observers noted that Spain and California, two troubled economies within Europe and the United States, and also Germany, the primary and politically most fragile supporter of a euro currency bailout would benefit from IMF recognition of their leadership in green technology, and directly from Green Fund–generated demand for their exports, which could also improve their credit ratings.

 

 

 

FOR OUR CHILDREN - The children of Burgas present Alberto Laplaine Guimarães with a gift from the Bulgarian City. Sustainable growth and aims for a circular economy are for our children and their children, and their children, and their children - lest we forget why we are working to clean our act up. We should hand the world to our successors in better shape than we found it. Copyright © photograph June 1 2018 Cleaner Ocean Foundation.

 

 

There are a number of organizations that exist to promote world peace and societal projects for the good of mankind. These include the United Nations, the World Bank, the International Monetary Fund (IMF) and many smaller concerns that grant aid suitable projects. In addition there are incentives by most countries to promote clean energy and blue growth, all aimed at keeping the status quo. At this time It is unclear from their website what the IMF's stance is on plastic waste economics, though we must assume that the Ocean Economy is in their minds at some level as it affects the GDP of many countries.

 

 

Poverty UN sustainability goals 1Zero hunger and food security UN SDG2Health and well being UN SDG3Education UN sustainable development goal 4Gender equaltiy for men and women UN SDG 5Sanitation and clean water for all SDG 6

Clean affordable energy for all UN sustainability goal 7Jobs and sustainable economic growth SDG 8Innovation in industry and sustainable infrastructure SDG 9Reduced inequalities for all sustainable development goal 10Cities and communities that are sustainable goal 11Consumption and production that is sustainable SDG 12

Action against climate change sustainable development goal 13Ocean and marine conservation UN sustainable development goals 14Biodiversity conserving life on land SDG 15Justice and institutional integrity for peace SDG 16Partnerships between governments and corporations SDG 17United Nations sustainable  development goals for 2030

 

 

OCEAN ACTION PLAN

 

The World needs an Ocean Action Plan to coordinate the efforts of member nations that in turn will benefit each other as the oceans move from one shoreline to the shores of a neighbor country. To help us develop an international strategy we need to generate sufficient funds to effectively make headway, estimated to be in the region of $10 million dollars to develop a SeaVax prototype. Follow on expenses, or pledges of ongoing support should be included to cover the cost of helping contributing nations to set up fleets of ocean cleaning boats - and running them in a network or pattern that stands the best chance of regenerating our oceans. We anticipate it will take around three years to get things moving.

 

 

PROPOSED ACTION PLAN IN BRIEF

 

An Action Plan will involve coordinated research, communications and operations designed to tackle marine plastic, working with other organizations and academics who are committed to such development, to make people aware of the dangers of plastic pollution and the need to review packaging policies.

 

An Action Plan will involve:

 

1. Developing ocean cleaning vessels and a central hub to coordinate plastic recovery missions and recycling.

 

2. Incorporate an awareness campaign to target young and old, to promote responsible use of plastics.

 

3. Lobbying Governments and Corporations for a rethink on product packaging design and recycling.

 

4. Collecting grants, accounting for and end of year reporting on progress to Ocean Alliance members.

 

5. As appropriate and to be agreed by members, winding down the 'Alliance' and handing operations over to individual nations or other international bodies once the plastic menace is averted.

 

 

World Oceans Anti-plastic Alliance (WOAA)

Cleaner Ocean Foundation Ltd

Solar Studios (Solar House)

BN271RF

United Kingdom.

 

Tel/Fax: 0044 1323 831727

Email: growth @ blue-growth . org

 

 

THE G20 HEADS OF STATE

 

 

 

 

ARGENTINA

 

 

 

AUSTRALIA

 

 

 

BRAZIL

 

 

 

CANADA

 

 

 

CHINA

 

 

EUROPEAN UNION

 

 

FRANCE

 

 

GERMANY

 

 

INDIA

 

 

INDONESIA

 

 

ITALY

 

 

JAPAN

 

 

MEXICO

 

 

RUSSIA

 

 

SAUDI ARABIA

 

 

SOUTH AFRICA

 

 

SOUTH KOREA

 

 

TURKEY

 

 

UNITED KINGDOM

 

 

UNITED STATES

 

 

 

 

FRANCE - PRESIDENT

 

 

EUROPEAN COMMISSION - PRESIDENT

 

 

 

 

LINKS & REFERENCE

 

http://www.imf.org/external/index.htm

 

 

 

 

 This website is provided on a free basis as a public information service. Copyright © Cleaner Oceans Foundation Ltd (COFL) (Company No: 4674774) 2018. Solar Studios, BN271RF, United Kingdom. COFL is a charity without share capital.

 

 

 

 

WE NEED AN ANTI-PLASTIC GLOBAL OCEAN ALLIANCE FOR WORLD FOOD SECURITY