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The European Union established a Commission to act as their executive and to promote its general interests. The Commission is composed of the College of Commissioners comprised of 28 members as seen below (@July 2017), including the President and Vice-Presidents. The Commissioners, one from each EU country, are the Commission's political leadership during a 5-year term. Each Commissioner is assigned responsibility for specific policy areas by the President.

 

 

 

 

BRUSSELS 27 OCTOBER 2017 - PRESS RELEASE

 

According to a press release in October 2017 the Commission is to invest €30 billion in new solutions for societal challenges and breakthrough innovation.

 

The European Commission today announced how it will spend €30 billion of the EU research and innovation funding programme Horizon 2020 during 2018-2020, including €2.7 billion to kick-start a European Innovation Council.

 

Horizon 2020, the EU's €77 billion research and innovation funding programme, supports scientific excellence in Europe and has contributed to high-profile scientific breakthroughs such as the discovery of exoplanets and gravitational waves. Over the next 3 years, the Commission will seek greater impact of its research funding by focusing on fewer, but critical topics such as migration, security, climate, clean energy and digital economy. Horizon 2020 will also be more geared towards boosting breakthrough, market-creating innovation.

 

Carlos Moedas, Commissioner for Research, Science and Innovation, said: "Artificial Intelligence, genetics, blockchain: science is at the core of today's most promising breakthrough innovations. Europe is a world leader in science and technology and will play a major role in driving innovation. The Commission is making a concerted effort – including with the European Innovation Council which takes its first steps today – to give Europe's many innovators a springboard to become world leading companies."

 

 

 

 

Supporting breakthrough, market-creating innovation

Since the beginning of its mandate, the Juncker Commission has been working hard to give Europe's many innovative entrepreneurs every opportunity to thrive. Now, the Commission is launching the first phase of the European Innovation Council.Between 2018 and 2020, the Commission will mobilise €2.7 billion from Horizon 2020 to support high-risk, high-gain innovation to create the markets of the future. Moreover, Horizon 2020 will make better use of its "crack the challenge" prizes to deliver breakthrough technology solutions to pressing problems faced by our citizens.

 

Focusing on political priorities

The 2018-2020 Work Programme will focus efforts on fewer topics with bigger budgets, directly supporting the Commission's political priorities:

 

* A low-carbon, climate resilient future: €3.3 billion

* Circular Economy: €1 billion

* Digitising and transforming European industry and services: €1.7 billion

* Security Union: €1 billion

* Migration: €200 million

 

€2.2 billion will be earmarked for clean energy projects in four interrelated areas: renewables, energy efficient buildings, electro-mobility and storage solutions, including €200 million to support the development and production in Europe of the next generation of electric batteries.

 

Boosting 'blue sky' research

 

At the same time, Horizon 2020 will continue to fund 'curiosity-driven science' (often referred to as 'blue sky science' or 'frontier research'). The annual Work Programme of the European Research Council for 2018, adopted in August, will enable support for excellent researchers with nearly €1.86 billion. Marie Skłodowska-Curie Actions, which fund fellowships for researchers at all stages of their careers, receive a boost with €2.9 billion in total over three years.

 

 

 

 

Enhancing international cooperation

 

The new Work Programme also strengthens international cooperation in research and innovation. It will invest over €1 billion in 30 flagship initiatives in areas of mutual benefit. Examples include working with Canada on personalised medicine, with the US, Japan, South Korea, Singapore and Australia on road transport automation, with India on water challenges and with African countries on food security and renewable energies.

 

Spreading excellence

 

Between 2018 and 2020, €460 million under Horizon 2020 will be allocated specifically to supporting Member States and associated countries that do not yet participate in the programme to their full potential. The aim is to tap into the unexploited pockets of excellence in Europe and beyond. In addition, the programme also continues to promote closer synergies with the European Structural and Investment Funds.

 

Simplifying rules of participation further

 

Another novelty is the introduction of the lump-sum pilot, a new, simpler approach to providing financial support to participants. It will shift the focus of ex-ante controls from financial checks to the scientific-technical content of the projects.

 

Open Science

 

The programme marks a step change in promoting Open Science by shifting from publishing research results in scientific publications towards sharing knowledge sooner in the research process. €2 billion will be channeled to support Open Science, and €600 million will be dedicated to the European Open Science Cloud, European Data Infrastructure and High Performance Computing.

 

 

A to Z of Europe

 

 

Background

 

Horizon 2020 is the EU's biggest ever research and innovation framework programme with a budget of €77 billion over seven years (2014-2020). While most research and innovation activities are still underway or yet to start, the programme is delivering.

 

Horizon 2020 researchers have contributed to major discoveries like exoplanets, the Higgs boson and gravitational waves, and at least 19 Nobel Prize winners received EU research funding prior or after their award.

 

As of October 2017, Horizon 2020 has in total funded more than 15 000 grants to the tune of €26.65 billion, of which almost €3.79 billion went to SMEs. The programme has also provided companies, in particular SMEs, with access to risk finance worth over €17 million under the "InnovFin - EU finance for innovators" scheme.

 

Furthermore,3,143 ERC Principal Investigators in host organisations and 10,176 fellows under the Marie Skłodowska-Curie Actions have received grants worth almost €4.87 billion and €2.89 billion respectively.

 

Simultaneous to the adoption of the Horizon 2020 Work Programme 2018-2020, the Euratom Work Programme 2018 has been adopted, investing €32 million in research into the management and disposal of radioactive waste. It will also develop a research roadmap on safe decommissioning of nuclear power plants to reduce environmental impact and costs.

 

For more information

 

MEMO: Horizon 2020 Work Programme 2018-2020

Factsheet: European Innovation Council

Factsheet: migration-related research

Factsheet: lump sum pilot

Country factsheets

Horizon 2020 website and calls

Participant portal

 

 

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Jean-Claude Juncker

President

Frans Timmermans

1st Vice President

Federica Mogherini

High Representative, V. President

Andrus Ansip

Vice President

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Maroš Šefčovič

Vice President

Valdis Dombrovskis

Vice President

Jyrki Katainen

Vice President

Günther H. Oettinger

Commissioner

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Johannes Hahn

Commissioner

Cecilia Malmström

Commissioner

Neven Mimica

Commissioner

Miguel Arias Cañete

Commissioner

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Karmenu Vella

Commissioner

Vytenis Andriukaitis

Commissioner

Dimitris Avramopoulos

Commissioner

Marianne Thyssen

Commissioner

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Pierre Moscovici

Commissioner

Christos Stylianides

Commissioner

Phil Hogan

Commissioner

Violeta Bulc

Commissioner

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Elżbieta Bieńkowska

Commissioner

Věra Jourová

Commissioner

Tibor Navracsics

Commissioner

Corina Crețu

Commissioner

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Margrethe Vestager

Commissioner

Carlos Moedas

Commissioner

Julian King

Commissioner

Mariya Gabriel

Commissioner

 


BLUE GROWTH

 

Some of the areas that the European Commission deal with that we are interested in are: Blue Growth, Climate Change, Ocean Energy and Marine Transport.

 

According to the EU's website Blue Growth is the long term strategy to support sustainable growth in the marine and maritime sectors as a whole. Seas and oceans are drivers for the European economy and have great potential for innovation and growth. It is the maritime contribution to achieving the goals of the Europe 2020 strategy for smart, sustainable and inclusive growth.

The 'blue' economy represents roughly 5.4 million jobs and generates a gross added value of almost €500 billion a year. However, further growth is possible in a number of areas which are highlighted within the strategy.

 

The strategy consists of three components:

 

1. Develop  sectors that have a high potential for sustainable jobs and growth, such as:

 

a. aquaculture (Fisheries website)

b. coastal tourism

c. marine biotechnology

d. ocean energy

e. seabed mining

 

2. Essential components to provide knowledge, legal certainty and security in the blue economy

 

a. marine knowledge to improve access to information about the sea;

b. maritime spatial planning to ensure an efficient and sustainable management of activities at sea;

c. integrated maritime surveillance to give authorities a better picture of what is happening at sea.

 

2. Sea basin strategies to ensure tailor-made measures and to foster cooperation between countries

 

a. Adriatic and Ionian Seas

b. Arctic Ocean

c. Atlantic Ocean

d. Baltic Sea

e. Black Sea

f. Mediterranean Sea

g. North Sea

 

 

 

THE COMMISSION - Group photograph of the European Commissioners in 2017.

 

 

 

EUROPEAN COMMISSION - Facebook: State of the Union 2017 front page.

 

 

A-Z COMMISSIONER LISTING

 

Andriukaitis, Vytenis

Ansip, Andrus

Avramopoulos, Dimitris

Bieńkowska, Elżbieta

Bulc, Violeta

Cañete, Miguel Arias 

Crețu, Corina

Dombrovskis, Valdis

Gabriel, Mariya

Hahn, Johannes

Hogan, Phil

Jourová, Věra

Juncker, Jean-Claude

Katainen, Jyrki

King, Julian

Malmström, Cecilia

Mimica, Neven

Moedas, Carlos

Mogherini, Federica

Moscovici, Pierre
Navracsics,
Tibor

Oettinger, Günther H.
Šefčovič,
Maroš

Stylianides, Christos

Thyssen, Marianne

Timmermans, Frans
Vella, Karmenu
Vestager,
Margrethe

 

 

 

 

The European Maritime Day (EMD) is the annual meeting point for Europe’s maritime community to network, discuss, and forge joint action, in support of an integrated approach to maritime affairs. It is an inspiring, interactive and dynamic event with a strong focus on key European Commission priorities. The EMD event was officially created on 20 May 2008 and since then is celebrated annually across Europe on 20 May.

 

 

EUROPEAN MARITIME DAY THEMES

 

* Brussels 2008: "A regional approach to the implementation of Maritime Policy"

* Rome 2009: "Integrated Maritime Policy and the contribution of maritime clusters" 

* Gijón 2010: "How to foster innovation?"

* Gdansk 2011: "Maritime Policy: Putting People First"

* Gothenburg 2012: "Sustainable Growth from the Oceans, Seas and Coasts"

* Valletta 2013: "Coastal Development and Sustainable Maritime Tourism"

* Bremen 2014: "Innovation driving Blue Growth"

* Piraeus 2015: "Ports and Coasts, Gateways to Maritime Growth"

* Turku 2016: "Investing in blue growth – smart and sustainable solutions"

* Poole 2017: "The Future of our Seas"

* Burgas 2018: Bulgaria "TBA"

* Lisbon 2019: Portugal "TBA"

* Cork 2020: Ireland "TBA"

* Den Helder 2021: The Netherlands "TBA"

* Ravenna 2022: Italy "TBA"

* Brest 2023: France "TBA"

* Svendborg 2024: Denmark "TBA"

 

The main event of any EMD is the European Maritime Day conference, held in a different region with a different theme each year. The EMD conference includes plenary sessions (with the participation of high level and key-experts), stakeholder workshops as well as B2B matchmaking meetings and an exhibition. It attracts regularly more than 1000 participants - policy-makers, maritime stakeholders, industry professionals and NGOs - from across the EU. For more information about European Maritime Day, please visit the EU's website:

 

 

 

 

EC PRESS CONTACTS:

Lucia CAUDET 

Email: lucia.caudet@ec.europa.eu

Tel +32 2 295 61 82

Victoria VON HAMMERSTEIN-GESMOLD

Email: victoria.von-hammerstein-gesmold@ec.europa.eu

Tel: +32 2 295 50 40
Maud NOYON (+32 2 298 03 79)

EC GENERAL INQUIRIES: 

Europe Direct by phone 00 800 67 89 10 11 or by email

 

 

EU Commissioner for maritime affairs, Karmenu Vella

 

CREATION - The European Maritime Day (EMD) was officially created on 20 May 2008 where the President of the European Parliament Hans-Gert Pöttering, Council President Janez Janša, and Commission President José Manuel Barroso signed a Joint Tripartite Declaration establishing it.

 

 

LINKS & REFERENCE

 

Role

Project team

Name

https://ec.europa.eu/maritimeaffairs/policy/blue_growth_en

https://ec.europa.eu/maritimeaffairs/policy/blue_growth_en

http://ec.europa.eu/maritimeaffairs/maritimeday/

https://ec.europa.eu/commission/commissioners/2014-2019_en

 

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THE COMMISSIONERS OF THE EUROPEAN UNION